Course Offerings

The following courses are lectures unless otherwise indicated. For those designated "laboratory," students should see the department's requirements for laboratories under "General Information."

Introduction to Modern Chemistry and Laboratory
CHEM-UA 120 Not open to students majoring in chemistry. Science majors and prehealth students take CHEM-UA 125 or 127. No prior chemistry is assumed. A knowledge of algebra is desirable. Offered every semester. 5 points.
Selected principles and applications of chemistry, with emphasis on the fundamental nature of chemistry. Basic course dealing with concepts of atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, solution chemistry, equilibrium, reaction rates, and properties of gases, liquids, and solids.

General Chemistry I and Laboratory
CHEM-UA 125 Formerly offered as CHEM-UA 101 and CHEM-UA 103. Prerequisites: high school chemistry and placement into Calculus I (MATH-UA 121) or completion of a course in precalculus. Offered every semester. 5 points.
An introduction to inorganic and physical chemistry for science majors, engineers, and the prehealth professions. Emphasizes the fundamental principles and theories of chemistry. Topics include the theories of atomic structure; stoichiometry; properties of gases, liquids, solids, and solutions; periodicity of the properties of elements; chemical bonding; equilibrium; kinetics, thermodynamics; acid-base reactions; electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The underlying unity of chemistry is a basic theme. Laboratories provide an introduction to basic techniques used in experimental chemistry. Many experiments use a computer interface to provide experience in modern methods of data collection and to allow thorough analysis of experimental results. Proper laboratory procedures, chemical safety rules, and environmentally sound methods of chemical disposal and waste minimization are important components of the course. Experiments are selected to provide illustration and reinforcement of course topics, including manual and automated titrations, basic chromatography, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, and colorimetry.

General Chemistry II and Laboratory
CHEM-UA 126 Formerly offered as CHEM-UA 102 and CHEM-UA 104. Prerequisite: General Chemistry I and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 125) or Advanced General Chemistry I and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 127) with a grade of C or better. Offered every semester. 5 points.
See General Chemistry I and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 125), above. Laboratories are a continuation of CHEM-UA 125, with emphasis on the analysis of quantitative data rather than its collection. Experiments are selected to provide illustration and reinforcement of the topics covered in the course, including solution chemistry, kinetics, equilibrium, buffers, solubility, and electrochemistry.

Advanced General Chemistry I and Laboratory
CHEM-UA 127 Formerly offered as CHEM-UA 109 and CHEM-UA 111. Prerequisites: high school physics, chemistry (Advanced Placement preferred), and calculus through derivatives and integrals; Calculus I (MATH-UA 121) or Honors Calculus I (MATH-UA 221) or any AP Calculus credit (or equivalent); and permission of the department. Corequisite: Calculus II (MATH-UA 122) or Honors Calculus II (MATH-UA 222). Offered in the fall. 5 points.
Covers the same material as CHEM-UA 125, except that students are selected and a different text is used, covering the material in greater depth. In addition to the core material, whenever possible, current research results pertaining to these topics are included in class discussions. Laboratories provide illustration and reinforcement of course topics. Experiments include studies of stoichiometry, acid-base chemistry, properties of gases, colligative properties of solutions, thermochemistry, equilibrium, electrochemistry, and kinetics. Many experiments are augmented by the use of interfaced computers. Also includes individualized projects intended to provide a research-like experience.

Advanced General Chemistry II and Laboratory
CHEM-UA 128 Formerly offered as CHEM-UA 110 and CHEM-UA 112. Prerequisites: Advanced General Chemistry I and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 127) and permission of the department. Offered in the spring. 5 points.
An advanced introductory course dealing with the kinetic molecular description of the states of matter, chemical thermodynamics, and the rates of chemical processes. Laboratories are a continuation of CHEM-UA 127.

Principles of Organic Chemistry and Laboratory
CHEM-UA 210 Prerequisite: Introduction to Modern Chemistry and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 120) with a grade of C or better. Not open to chemistry majors. Intended primarily for nonscience majors and students in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. Offered every semester. 5 points.
This one-semester course covers topics such as nomenclature, conformations, stereochemistry, chemical reactions, and synthesis of organic compounds. Fundamentals of biochemistry are introduced, including carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, peptides, and nucleic acids.

Organic Chemistry I and Laboratory
CHEM-UA 225 Formerly offered as CHEM-UA 243 and CHEM-UA 245. Prerequisite: General Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 126) or Advanced General Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 128) with a grade of C or better. Offered every semester. 5 points.
An introduction to the chemistry of organic compounds. The material is presented in the functional group framework, incorporating reaction mechanisms. Topics include structure and bonding of organic materials, nomenclature, conformational analysis, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, amines, and carbonyl compounds. Multifunctional organic compounds are covered, including topics of relevance to biochemistry, such as carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, and nucleic acids. Laboratories provide training in the basic techniques of the organic chemistry laboratory, including crystallization, distillation, extraction, and other separation techniques, such as column chromatography. Experiments involving the synthesis of organic compounds are introduced, as well as qualitative organic analysis.

Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory
CHEM-UA 226 Formerly offered as CHEM-UA 244 and CHEM-UA 246. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry I and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 225) or Majors Organic Chemistry I and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 227) with a grade of C or better. Offered every semester. 5 points.
A continuation of the study of chemistry of organic compounds. The material is presented in the functional group framework, incorporating reaction mechanisms. Topics include structure and bonding of organic materials, nomenclature, conformational analysis, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, and reactions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, amines, and carbonyl compounds. Multifunctional organic compounds are covered, including topics of relevance to biochemistry, such as carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, and nucleic acids. Laboratories provide training in the syntheses of organic precursors in high yields and high purity needed for multistep procedures. An extensive research project involving unknown compounds is conducted. The use of IR and NMR spectroscopy is explored.

Majors Organic Chemistry I and Laboratory
CHEM-UA 227 Formerly offered as CHEM-UA 325, CHEM-UA 341, and CHEM-UA 245. Prerequisites: General Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 126) or Advanced General Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 128) and permission of the department. Offered in the fall. 5 points.
Emphasizes the theory and structures of covalent bonded materials and develops greater insight into reaction mechanisms, plus the challenges and creativity leading to scientific discovery. Open only to declared chemistry and biochemistry majors.

Majors Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory
CHEM-UA 228 Formerly offered as CHEM-UA 326, CHEM-UA 342, and CHEM-UA 246. Prerequisites: Majors Organic Chemistry I and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 227) and permission of the department. Offered in the spring. 5 points.
A continuation of CHEM-UA 227. Similar to CHEM-UA 226, except in greater depth. In this second semester, emphasis is placed on oxygen-bearing functional groups such as ketones, acids, and acid derivatives, and their importance in forming carbon-to-carbon bonds. These topics are further extended to polyfunctional compounds such as carbohydrates. Open only to declared chemistry and biochemistry majors.

Physical Chemistry: Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy
CHEM-UA 651 Formerly Physical Chemistry I. Prerequisites: General Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 126) or Advanced General Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 128); Calculus II (MATH-UA 122) or Honors Calculus II (MATH-UA 222); two semesters of physics with grades of C or better; and a 2.0 average in all prior chemistry requirements. Calculus III (MATH-UA 123) and/or Linear Algebra (MATH-UA 140) are strongly recommended but not required. Offered in the fall and spring. 4 points.
An introduction to quantum mechanics—general principles and applications to important model systems. Covers electronic structure of one- and many-electron atoms, theory of chemical bonding in diatomic and polyatomic molecules. Includes principles and applications of molecular spectroscopy: rotational, vibrational, electronic, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Elements of photochemistry are also included.

Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Kinetics
CHEM-UA 652 Formerly Physical Chemistry II. Prerequisites: General Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 126) or Advanced General Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 128); Calculus II (MATH-UA 122) or Honors Calculus II (MATH-UA 222); two semesters of physics with grades of C or better; and a 2.0 average in all prior chemistry requirements. Calculus III (MATH-UA 123) and/or Linear Algebra (MATH-UA 140) are strongly recommended but not required. Offered in the fall and spring. 4 points.
Develops the close connection between the microscopic world of quantum mechanics and the macroscopic world of thermodynamics. Topics include properties of gases, kinetics, elementary statistical thermodynamics, and thermodynamics of single and multicomponent systems.

Physical Chemistry Laboratory

CHEM-UA 661 Formerly Experimental Methods. Prerequisite: General Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 126) or Advanced General Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 128). Prerequisites or corequisites: Both Physical Chemistry: Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy (CHEM-UA 651) and Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Kinetics (CHEM-UA 652). Laboratory and lecture. Offered in the spring. 4 points.
Introduction to the principles and practices of experimental methods widely used in analytical and research laboratories. Emphasizes understanding of background physicochemical theory, as well as capabilities and limitations of methods and interpretations of data. Covers instrumental methods, such as UV/visible spectroscopy, FT-IR, NMR, and fluorescence, for the systematic characterization of compounds and the use of interfaced computers for data collection and spreadsheet analysis. Studies also include an introduction to computer modeling of molecular properties. Optional experiments include fluorescence studies of protein denaturation and laser studies of excited state kinetics.

Electronics for Scientists
CHEM-UA 671 Identical to BIOL-UA 110, PHYS-UA 110. Prerequisite: General Physics II (PHYS-UA 12), Physics II (PHYS-UA 93), or permission of the instructor. 5 points.
See description under Physics.

Inorganic Chemistry
CHEM-UA 711 Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 226) or Majors Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 228) with a grade of C or better, and either Physical Chemistry: Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy (CHEM-UA 651) or Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Kinetics (CHEM-UA 652) or permission of the instructor. Offered in the spring beginning in 2014. 4 points.
Studies of methods in inorganic chemistry that make use of symmetry to describe bonding and spectra of inorganic compounds. Reactions and kinetics are also discussed for inorganic, organometallic, and bioinorganic compounds. Selected topics in main group chemistry are also included.

Advanced Organic/Inorganic Laboratory
CHEM-UA 731 Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 226) or Majors Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 228) with a grade of B or better, or permission of the instructor. Laboratory. Offered in the fall. 4 points.
Advanced laboratory emphasizing techniques commonly used in synthetic inorganic and organic chemistry research. Instruction in techniques such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, cyclic voltammetry, polarimetry, circular dichroism, vibrational spectroscopy, air-sensitive techniques, and thin-layer, column, and high-pressure liquid chromatography. Research examples from nanotechnology, chiral technology, ruthenium electrophotochemistry, porphyrin, and peptide synthesis are explored.

Biochemistry I, II
CHEM-UA 881, 882 Formerly CHEM-GA 1881, 1882. Prerequisite for CHEM-UA 881: Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 226) or Majors Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 228). Prerequisite for CHEM-UA 882: CHEM-UA 881. CHEM-UA 881 offered in the fall and spring; CHEM-UA 882 offered in the spring. 4 points per term.
Introduction to the chemistry of living cells. Topics include structure and function of proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids; enzyme structure, mechanism, and regulation of enzyme activity, and membrane structure and transport; and mechanisms of cellular processes and cellular physiology, including ion channels and pumps, cell motility, and the immune response. The second term emphasizes analysis of basic metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, electron transport, and oxidative phosphorylation, as well as mechanisms of metabolic regulation and integration.

Experimental Biochemistry and Laboratory
CHEM-UA 885 Formerly CHEM-GA 1885. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 226) or Majors Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 228). Prerequisite or corequisite: Biochemistry I (CHEM-UA 881). Laboratory. Offered in the fall. 4 points.
Introduction to molecular analysis of biomolecules. Selected experiments and instruction in analytical techniques used in biochemical research, including chromatography, spectrophotometry, and electrophoresis; isolation and characterization of selected biomolecules; kinetic analysis of enzymatic activity; analysis of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions that direct basic biochemical pathways.

Advanced Biochemistry
CHEM-UA 890 Formerly CHEM-GA 1814 (Biophysical Chemistry). Prerequisites or corequisites: Physical Chemistry: Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy (CHEM-UA 651) and Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Kinetics (CHEM-UA 652). Recommended:  Biochemistry I (CHEM-UA 881). Offered in the spring. 4 points.
Overview of physical and chemical principles and their applications to modern topics of biochemical, biomedical and biological interest. The emphasis is on the basic principles of typical biophysical techniques that are used to study important macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. Topics include molecular spectroscopic techniques such as light absorption, fluorescence techniques, optical activity, electrophoresis, and nuclear magnetic resonance. Applications from selected areas of biomedicine and biotechnology are described that include examples focused on biomolecular spectroscopy, single molecule spectroscopy and molecular beacons, DNA technology, and fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.

Advanced Organic Chemistry (Formerly Organic Reactions)
CHEM-UA 911 Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 226) or Majors Organic Chemistry II (CHEM-UA 228) with a C or better. Offered in the spring. 4 points.
This course focuses on structure and theory in organic chemistry with a particular emphasis on the application of stereoelectronic and conformational effects on reaction mechanisms, catalysis and molecular recognition.

Senior Honors in Chemistry
CHEM-UA 995, 996 Prerequisites: completion of the required core courses for the major and permission of the department. Open only to chemistry or biochemistry majors entering their senior year who have maintained an overall average of 3.65 in their course of study and in the courses required for their major. Required for candidates for the degree with honors. CHEM-UA 995 offered in the fall; CHEM-UA 996 offered in the spring. 2 to 4 points per term.
In consultation with the director of undergraduate studies, the student chooses a faculty member to serve as adviser in an independent program of research in experimental or theoretical chemistry. The student selects an adviser in the spring of the junior year or earlier and undertakes the work that spring, the following summer, and into the senior year. A written progress report at the end of the fall semester of the senior year is required. The research is completed during the spring term, and the student presents the work at the annual College of Arts and Science Undergraduate Research Conference near the end of the term. The research culminates in the writing of a senior thesis that must be approved by the adviser and the director of undergraduate studies.

Advanced Independent Study and Research
CHEM-UA 997, 998 Prerequisite: permission of the department. Open to students majoring in chemistry or biochemistry who have maintained an average of 3.0 or better in all departmentally required courses and who possess the necessary ability to pursue research in a field of chemistry or biochemistry. The research adviser is selected in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. Laboratory. CHEM-UA 997 offered in the fall; CHEM-UA 998 offered in the spring. 2 to 4 points per term.
Individual study in a selected area tailored to the student's needs, insofar as is possible. Training is provided in current research areas. Requires a written progress report at the end of the fall semester and a final research report at the close of the academic year.


Graduate Courses Open to Advanced Undergraduates

Graduate courses in chemistry may be taken for undergraduate credit with the permission of the instructor and director of undergraduate studies. In addition to the courses listed below, other 2000-level chemistry courses are open to advanced undergraduates. For further information, see the Director of Undergraduate Studies and consult the Graduate School of Arts and Science Bulletin. Other courses may be considered with permission of the instructor and director of undergraduate studies.

Strategies in Synthetic Organic Chemistry
CHEM-GA 1312 Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 226 or 228), Physical Chemistry: Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy (CHEM-UA 651), and Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Kinetics (CHEM-UA 652). Offered in the spring. 4 points.
Emphasizes biologically active and structurally interesting compounds.

Organic Reaction Mechanisms
CHEM-GA 1314 Prerequisites: Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 226 or 228), Physical Chemistry: Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy (CHEM-UA 651), and Physical Chemistry: Thermodynamics and Kinetics (CHEM-UA 652). Offered in the spring. 4 points.
Discussion of the mechanisms of organic reactions, including the interrelationship between structure and mechanism, nucleophilic and free radical substitution, as well as thermal and photochemical cyclo-addition reactions.

Organic Analysis
CHEM-GA 1326 Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 226) or Majors Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 228) with a grade of B or better, or permission of the instructor. Offered in the fall. 4 points.
Emphasizes the application of spectroscopic methods in organic chemistry in determining molecular structure, including proton and carbon NMR, infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, modern methods of mass spectroscopy, and chiroptical spectroscopy.

Bioorganic Chemistry
CHEM-GA 2884 Prerequisites: either Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 226) or Majors Organic Chemistry II and Laboratory (CHEM-UA 228), and Biochemistry I (CHEM-UA 881), or permission of the instructor. Offered in the spring. 4 points.
Covers a broad range of topics at the interface between organic chemistry and biology. Focus is placed on current advances in bioorganic chemistry, chemical biology, molecular pharmacology, functional genomics, and molecular evolution. Students are expected to enter the class with previous course work in the chemical structure and conformation of polypeptides and nucleic acids.

Updated on 06/25/2013